Neighborhood dispute in Central El Paso sparks questions about parking rules

Traffic

EL PASO, Texas (KTSM) — A parking dispute in Central El Paso is leaving some El Paso residents wondering where they can and can’t park. 

Residential areas can get crowded, if there is no parking in front of your own house you may opt to park in front of your neighbors.

However, that’s what’s leading to conflict in one central neighborhood. One neighbor has been upset that other neighbors park in front of the houses he owns.

Robert Cormell a well-known businessman in the city who ran for City Council in 2017 and Mayor in 2013 is allegedly leaving notes on windshields asking neighbors to park somewhere else.

He even came to one tenant’s door late at night asking her to mover her car. 

“He was suggesting that I just park across the street at someone else’s house but again that’s still the same problem that I’m parking in front of someone else’s house,“ says Kaitlin Conner who has received multiple notes. “It’s scary to live here now and know that he could come pounding at my door at any time of night. I didn’t think we would do that from just writing notes, but he still did.”

She explained she wants to park in front of her house but it’s a busy public street and there isn’t always parking available.

However, Cormell argues that some houses have too many cars for one house, and they should be more courteous. 

“This is the rule, this is the unsaid rule you know the city can say you can’t tell anybody to park but you can live with people and you can live with neighbors peacefully,” said Cormell.

He also added that he is concerned about the safety of people at night.

“If that was my daughter, OK, wouldn’t you want her to park in front of her house, so she can walk up there easily,” he said.  

According to the City, this particular street doesn’t have any parking restrictions, and they say no one can dictate where others park since it’s a public street.

According to the City, there are places you cannot stop or park your vehicle. Those places include:

  • On a sidewalk
  • In an intersection
  • Within 15 feet (4.57 m) of a fire hydrant
  • Within 20 feet (6.1 m) of a crosswalk 
  • Blocking a driveway

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