Clint homeowners feel helpless after denied request for speed bumps

Traffic
Clint residents reached out to KTSM and said there are too many drivers speeding right in front of their homes in the area near North Loop and Alameda.
 
After a year of back-and-forth, homeowners who live off Estate Drive say they are tired of witnessing drivers speeding right in front of their homes every day. 
 
“It’s just frustrating that there’s really nothing we, as the homeowners here on the street, can do. Other than ask for help that’s not just going to be able to be given to us right now,” resident Cristinna Yslas said.
 
That’s why they decided to gather a petition from the neighborhood and request from the county to place speed bumps on the road.
 
“It did appear that there were more cars that were exceeding the speed limit, but according to the standards that are followed to establish these policies for speed bumps, essentially due to my growth this road has become as what we refer to as a minor arterial,” County Commissioner Vince Perez explained. “There’s a significant level of traffic now on this road where speed bumps typically have now just not become practical.”
 
A traffic study conducted in April showed more than 1,000 vehicles pass through Estate Drive daily.
 
Perez also said as more homes arise each year, the county continues to evolve its policies.
 
“We’re constantly updating it as the situation is changing very rapidly out there,” Perez said. “For example, I’m sure everybody has seen speed limit signs that have radar on them that if you’re exceeding the speed limit, it will start to blink. So, even though if a speed bump hasn’t become a viable option anymore because of the volume of traffic, well then perhaps we could look at something like that.”
 
Neighbors told KTSM if speed bumps can’t be put in place, drivers should be responsible and held accountable.
 
“Just be considerate. Keep in mind, wherever you’re driving by, that’s somebody’s house. Somebody’s kids live there, they could be out in the front yard,” Yslas said. “Just like you would want somebody to drive in front of your house and respect the speed limit, that’s all we ask.”
 
Perez added the current policy for speed bumps is expected to be revised by August, so there will be new recommendations brought to the County Commissioners court. 

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