Fort Bliss soldier accused of rape testifies he was molested as a child, kept log of sexual partners

El Paso News

EL PASO, Texas (KTSM) –Private First Class (Pfc.) Christian Alvarado spoke his first words in a general court-martial where he is facing multiple counts of sexual assault and strangulation.

Prosecutors approached the 21-year-old during a hearing on Wednesday asking him if he swore to tell the truth.

“I do,” Alvarado said, his words barely audible.

“I’m going to need you to speak up,” the judge directed. 

“Yes, I do,” he repeated. 

Prosecutors then proceeded to ask Alvarado about his enlistment into the U.S. Army.

“Did you tell Special Agents Diamond and Postma, Richter, and Major Cardona each different stories?” asked the Prosecution.

“Yes ma’am,” he responded, regarding his statements to military investigators with the Criminal Investigation Division (CID), his superiors, and the psychologist for the Defense.

“Did you tell different stories under oath?” she asked.

“Yes,” he replied.

“Did you lie about your security clearance, G.T. score, and a football scholarship to Arizona State University as a walk-on?” the prosecution asked.

Alvarado, who was soft spoken and respectful when the Defense called him as a witness a little while earlier, corrected his posture, leaned into the microphone and spoke very clearly.

“Ma’am, are you familiar with Arizona?” he responded.

Members of the gallery widened their eyes and the Judge leaned in his chair before giving Alvarado a firm order.

“She is asking the questions, not you.”

Alvarado told Cardona that he attended Arizona State University (ASU) for one month as a member of the football team before being kicked out for fighting.

“When did you graduate high school?” asked the prosecution.

“March 2019,” Alvarado replied.

Alvarado’s high school transcripts show he graduated in June 2019 from Skyline High School in Mesa, Arizona.

“When did you go to training with the ASU football team? When they were offering you a scholarship as a walk-on?”

“June, ma’am,” he replied.

“So even though NCAA rules would not allow June participation, and training occurs in July and August, they let you?” a prosecutor asked.

Immediately after, the prosecutor shifted the focus of her questions.

The court was shown football highlight reel depicting a player in a white and black football uniform, marked “6.”

The colors match Valley Vista High School, also in Mesa, and the uniform number corresponded to another football player named Christian Alvarado.

The Huddl App profile for you says you went to Skyline, has no stats, lists you as 165 pounds,” she started, “but Skyline’s colors are green and yellow — not black and white as appears in the reels. The colors are from Valley Vista — and you weren’t number ‘6.’”

“Have you checked?” he quipped. 

Again, the Judge reminded the accused he was not in the position to ask questions. 

“So, a Division I school offered you a football scholarship?”

“Well, maybe it was a community college,” Alvarado answered. “My mom handled all that.”

He later clarified, “I never attended ASU, I just partied there.”

The Prosecution moved on to questions regarding whether if had ever seen a mental health provider.

Alvarado told investigators that he had no mental health history to report when they interviewed him under oath.

When interviewed by Major Cardona, he said he had an extensive mental health history to treat ADHD, that his family had a history of mental health challenges, and he also received treatment for sexual abuse.

Alvarado disclosed to the court he was molested as a child by one of his mother’s close friends. 

The Prosecution questioned why he did not disclose his history to the defense’s psychologist.

Court documents show that Alvarado signed that he had no history of sexual abuse before joining the Army, which the court martial testimony contradicts. 

Alvarado described a long history of physical abuse as a child that included injuries like a fractured skull and broken jaw.

“And, you asked Cardona not to contact your mom about school or the domestic violence?” the prosecutor said.

“Yes ma’am,” Alvarado answered.

Multiple legal documents with Alvarado’s signature attest that he had never broken a bone prior to joining the military. 

The CID interviewers asked Alvarado last summer whether he had ever had run-ins with law enforcement.

He said — under oath — he had been pulled over before but that was it.

The Prosecution noted that Alvardo’s license was suspended in January 2021 pending charges for a DUI.

“Did you tell Major Cardona that you started stealing cars when you were 10?” asked the prosecution.

“Yes,” she said.

“That you were involved with a gang in high school and a ‘designated hitter?’” the prosecutor asked.

“Yes ma’am.” he answered.

“That you had numerous run-ins with police and the juvenile court system?” the prosecutor continued.

“Yes ma’am,” he said.

During Alvarado’s first interview with Army investigators, he informed agent Diamond he had amassed 42 sexual partners, and told Postma he kept an annotated log of his sexual partners. 

When interviewed by Cardona he said he had 57 partners, most in his log.

“So you have 15 new partners between and after your interview with Diamond and before pre-trial confinement when you talked to Cardona,” a prosecutor asked.

“Yes,” he answered.

“And this was while you were being investigated on different allegations of sexual assault, by two women?” the prosecution continued.

“Yes,” he answered.

“And while your wife was pregnant?” the prosecutor asked.

“She was my girlfriend at the time, we weren’t married yet,” he said.

Alvarado said he married his pregnant girlfriend in November 2020, but that it was annulled by her at some point and he was unsure of the status or length of his marriage.

The prosecution claimed to trace a pattern of Alvarado lying to avoid trouble, whether to law enforcement or sexual partners — even while under oath.

“You knew you had to tell the truth and lied anyway?” asked the Prosecution. 

“Yes ma’am,” he said.

The prosecution moved onto analysis of his conversations with the defense’s psychologist. They gravitated around relationships with women and morality in sexual behavior.

Cardona’s summaries of sessions with Alvarado note that he allegedly said the level of inebriation, or how intoxicated someone is, doesn’t matter and that “drunk sex is fine.” 

The report claims that Alvarado told Cardona that the #MeToo movement was responsible for the allegations he was facing.

“Did you tell Cardona, ‘these mother f*ckers are going to trip when they see me walk?” the prosecution asked.

“Yes ma’am,” he replied.

Then one last question.

“Is Asia (Graham) in your notebook?” asked the Prosecution.

“Yes ma’am,” he replied.

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