Syrian Refugee in Germany shares thoughts about immigration in Borderland

Immigration

A Syrian refugee who risked his life to cross into Germany illegally to seek asylym shares his thoughts on Central Americans risking their lives to enter the U.S.

A Syrian refugee who risked his life to cross into Germany illegally to seek asylum shares his thoughts on Central Americans risking their lives to enter the U.S.

Firas Zakri said migration is something that has always existed and thinks people need to be more accepting as people will always risk their life for a better one.

“If people are lucky, it will sink by the seashore. But most of the cases, it will sink on the way,” said Zakri.

Syrian refugee, Firas Zakri said he saw two others, in the same boat as he, drown. He said it is common as people try to leave the war in Syria.

On land, like many who cross at the U.S.-Mexico border, Zakri made the decision of dealing with smugglers.

“People say why are you talking with the smugglers? They don’t have any morals or ethics or anything,” he said. “If you’re lucky you can get to the other side but if you are not lucky, this is a one-way ticket. It’s a very dangerous way but it is the only way to go to the other side because you are not accepted in a legal way.”

Zakri managed to travel to Berlin on his own. His wife and son joined him after Germany accepted him as a refugee.

For Zakri, it was a bomb that pushed him to take the dangerous journey.

“30 seconds later, a bomb landed in the same spot that we were, killing 8 people at once,” he said.

He said people don’t want to move to a strange country with a different language for no reason. They feel like it’s their last option he said.

“It’s hard for people to accept that there is suffering, there is suffering in the world around them and people need to a little bit tolerating,” said Zakri.

Zakri said like his story there are many others including stories of people migrating to the U.S.

In 2015 and 2016, more than a million asylum seekers entered into Germany, according to Germany’s Federal Office for Migration and Refugees.

Those same years, there were about 9,000 deaths in the Mediterranean, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

The numbers have been dropping since then.

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