Former NMSU faculty member develops nanotech filter coating to help fight COVID-19 spread

Coronavirus

EL PASO, Texas (KTSM) — With Pfizer and Moderna’s coronavirus vaccines reaching more than a 90-percent effective rate, we’re starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel for a return to normalcy.

To add to the fight against this virus, a former New Mexico State University faculty member and current Physics professor with the University of Houston has developed a nanotech filter coating designed to allow air filters to capture airborne or aerosolized droplets of the virus that spreads COVID-19.

Professor Seamus Curran joined KTSM 9 News to tell us a little more about the new technology.

J: How is this nanotech filter capable of capturing airborne virus particles?

Curran: The coating works by capturing liquids, which encase the virus particles while still allowing air to flow through unimpeded. That allows ventilation systems to remove the virus during normal operation.

J: Is anyone currently using this nanotech filter right now and how can we tell if it’s working?

Curran: The coated filters are currently installed in one public building in New York City. Balancing filtration with airflow is critical to indoor air quality — a key issue as colder weather in some parts of the country pushes more people indoors.

To learn more about Curran’s work, visit https://uh.edu/news-events/stories/2020/september-2020/09292020-curran-covid-filter.php.

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