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Like GOP, evangelicals look to rebrand

Like GOP, evangelicals look to rebrand
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Tuesday, March 26, 2013 - 5:38pm

There's been a lot of debate about the Republican Party's need to rebrand after the 2012 presidential defeat, but could evangelicals face the same challenge?

The evangelical community, too, has been involved in some collective soul-searching. Evangelical leaders constantly warn that young people are deserting churches; pastors struggle to address changing views on homosexuality; and others wonder how evangelicals can remain relevant when a growing number of Americans refuse to identify with any religion.

Relevant magazine, an evangelical publication, tackles these issues head-on in its latest issue with an article titled "10 Challenges Facing Us in The Next Decade."

"The future is coming faster than ever," the article says, "with the tectonic plates of society, church, culture, technology, economy and environment shifting beneath us."

How the church should change to meet this future is the thrust of the article. The magazine asked some of the nation's top evangelical leaders for their take on the biggest challenges facing the church in the next decade.

Their answers varied, and some were surprising.

John Mark McMillan, a worship leader and musician, says religious entertainers can't save evangelicals. Building more megachurches with slicker worship services that feature skits, live music and hip pastors in skinny jeans won't do the trick.

"How will we avoid the temptation to simply draw crowds?" McMillan asks. "While a floating head on a Jumbotron can instruct us, I think we can only grow to maturity when we learn to love at point-blank range, where the messy aspects of relationship can't be avoided."

Another evangelical leader says making marriage relevant for a new generation is the big challenge. David Kinnaman, whose book "You Lost Me" examines why young evangelicals are leaving the church, says more youth see heterosexual marriage as outdated.

Relevant cited statistics from the Pew Research Center that show 44% of millennials (people age 18-29) say marriage is becoming obsolete.

"Millennials face many challenges when it comes to marriage," Kinnaman says. "They have more financial pressure, more readily available sexual temptations, fewer social inhibitions with infidelity, not to mention overly distracted spouses who are working hard to get ahead or 'screening' away their valuable time."

Shane Claiborne, author of "The Irresistible Revolution" and a founding member of an alternative community called the Simple Way, points to another challenge.

He says evangelicals must broaden the definition of "pro-life."

Claiborne says we live in a nation where gun violence kills 10,000 people every year, dozens are executed under the death penalty, and the threat of nuclear annihilation looms.

Claiborne's suggestion: Create a Life Party of Christians who "insist on protecting life in all its dazzling forms."

"I hope that we can decrease and eliminate abortion, embrace the immigrant and orphans, end the death penalty in the U.S. and see poor people cared for," Claiborne says.

Evangelicals can't meet the future by simply altering the delivery of their message. The message will have to change in some ways as well, says Shane Hipps, author of "Selling Water by the River."

"The historic strength of evangelical churches to innovate methods without altering the underlying message will no longer have the same impact," he says. "That's because the cultural shift now under way is not merely about music preferences or the use of video clips in sermons."

Hipps' solution for the future is to learn a lesson from the past. He cited Dietrich Bonhoeffer, the German pastor martyred by the Third Reich during the closing days of World War II.

"We must learn to embrace what Dietrich Bonhoeffer called 'religionless Christianity,' " Hipps says. "These people will press beyond the tired religious categories of 'liberal' and "conservative.' They will see the life and teachings of Jesus not as religious or even spiritual in nature, but rather as fundamentally human."
 

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