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Colored Lenses Help Dyslexic Students See The Page in a Whole New Way

Colored Lenses Help Dyslexic Students See The Page in a Whole New Way
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Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 7:03pm

BATON ROUGE, LA  — It almost seems like science fiction, glasses specially designed to enable dyslexic students to see words clearly on a page, for the first time in their lives.

"When I put the glasses on, the words really spaced out and it made me read the words a lot faster," Luke Arnold, a dyslexic student, explained.

"They see words that move one way, they move in and out of focus. They move from left to right, up and down, they describe them as scrunching together, pulling apart. We make those words stop moving," Ted Edwards, Chroma-Gen CEO, added.

For eleventh grader Luke Arnold reading has always been a struggle. He said for the first time in his life, with the help of the Chroma-Gen technology, he's easily comprehending what he's reading.

"It just seemed like he was understanding what he was reading so much better. it wasn't like he was just reading words on the page. It’s like he was reading with meaning," Amy Arnold, Luke’s mother, added.

Just like prescription lenses each person will need a different lens or combination of lenses. The lenses are also shaded different colors, those colors are used to correct an imbalance the dyslexic brain sees when looking at words.

"They’re all a different color, colors are a different wavelength. So what we basically do is we slow down, through the use of color, we slow down the neurological transmission that goes through the eye to the brain," Edwards explained.

And for students, like Luke, who have struggled all their lives to comprehend the words on a page, putting on those glasses was an exciting and emotional experience for both him and his mother Amy.

"I am just happy for him. Happy that he's going to be more comfortable reading, and it's very exciting," Amy Arnold said, close to tears.

The lenses can't help every dyslexic person, but they do create an improvement in two out of every three cases.
  

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